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Professors in the Boardroom and their Impact on Corporate Governance and Firm Performance

See on Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

Abstract:      
Directors from academia served on the boards of more than one third of S&P 1,500 firms over the 1998-2006 period. This paper investigates the effects of academic directors on corporate governance and firm performance. We find that companies with directors from academia are associated with higher performance. In addition, we find that professors without administrative jobs drive the positive relation between academic directors and firm performance. We also show that professors’ educational backgrounds affect the identified relationship. For example, academic directors with business-related degrees have the most positive impacts on firm performance among all the academic fields considered in our regressions. Furthermore, we show that academic directors play an important governance role through their monitoring and advising functions. Specifically, we find that the presence of academic directors is associated with higher acquisition performance, higher number of patents, higher stock price informativeness, lower discretionary accruals, lower CEO compensation, and higher CEO turnover-performance sensitivity. Overall, our results provide supportive evidence that academic directors are effective monitors and valuable advisors, and that firms benefit from academic directors.

The authors: “Our paper is the first to focus entirely on the impact of academic directors on corporate governance and firm performance. Our analysis extends the literature on board characteristics and firm performance. We find that directors from academia are beneficial to shareholders. Our results indicate that both directors’ monitoring and advising functions are important for board efficacy and firm performance. Furthermore, our study complements the board-independence literature by showing that independence is not enough to enhance board efficacy. Additional director attributes, such as advising abilities, could be important for making outside directors more beneficial to firm value. Therefore, this paper furthers our understanding on the relation between board independence and firm value. “

 

Source:

 

Professors in the Boardroom and their Impact on Corporate Governance and Firm Performance

 

Bill Francis 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) – Lally School of Management & Technology

Iftekhar Hasan 
Bank of Finland

Qiang Wu 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) – Lally School of Management and Technology

February 28, 2013

See on papers.ssrn.com

Business school output: A conceptualisation of business school graduates

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Abstract

Extant literature has illustrated that business schools are currently pre-occupied with promoting and teaching optimization, efficiency and effectiveness, maximization and profitability. Too little attention is afforded to promoting the skills of analysis and critical thinking or the mastery of theories, abstract conception or a wider appreciation of moral principles. Our contribution deepens the debate about the purpose of business schools by creating a typology of ‘types’ of Business School Graduates (BSGs). We suggest that, as well as influencing the future of their graduates, business schools should be responsible for what ‘type’ of BSG they produce. Our typology offers four types – the Replacer, the Effectiveness Increaser, the World Improver and the Reflectionist. We propose that in future business schools should place emphasis on providing a wider education balancing human, environmental and economic perspectives. More credence must be given to the latter two types of BSG as opposed to the first two, who are the favoured choices of today.

 

The authors:

“Just as doctors have an ethical protocol to abide by and an ethics

committee to answer to when they do wrong, the same might be considered for the business community. So numerous are the examples of wrong doing, from simple deception to downright fraud that, just like the doctor who can lose their license to practice medicine, so too might a businessperson lose their right to practice business (Currie et al., 2010). To some extent, the school from which the wrong-doer graduated might also be held accountable. This might reduce the propensity of students to study business solely to maximize profit.”

 

Source:

Business school output: A conceptualisation of business school graduatesAnders Örtenblad, Riina Koris, Maris Farquharson, Shih-wei ‘Bill’ HsuThe International Journal of Management Education

Volume 11, Issue 2, July 2013, Pages 85–92. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijme.2013.02.001

See on www.sciencedirect.com

Metaphors of management research; ‘Beasts, burrowers and birds’: The enactment of researcher identities in UK business schools

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Abstract

In this article, we suggest that management research constitutes a field of practice that is made practically intelligible through embodied enactment. This relies on imagination, constructing modes of belonging within communities of management research practice. Undergraduate students constitute a significant audience towards whom these self-presentational performances are directed. Our analysis is based on findings from four UK business schools where students participated in a free drawing and focus group exercise and were asked to visualize a management researcher. Through identification of three dominant animal metaphors of management research practice, we explore the symbolic relations whereby a prevailing image of the management researcher, as untouchable, solitary, aggressive, competitive and careerist, is socially constructed. We argue that this competitive, self-interested impression of research is detrimental to ethical, critically reflexive, reciprocal and participatory modes of research, and to the development of management research as a broadly inclusive system of social learning.

 

The authors:

“The dominant animal metaphors that emerged from our study act as powerful organizational symbols that serve to frame reality (Kostera, 2008) by defining what constitutes a ‘successful’ management researcher and enabling alternative images to be rejected. This raises concerns about the ethics of management research practice, in particular the potentially exclusionary and marginalizing consequences of these images, for those who cannot or choose not to conform to them. Disappointingly, this competitive, self-interested image prevails despite repeated calls for greater managerial collaboration (Tranfield and Starkey, 1998), involved action (Chia and Holt, 2008), reciprocity (Bell and Bryman, 2007) and practical rationality (Sandberg and Tsoukas, 2011) in management research.”

 

Source:

‘Beasts, burrowers and birds’: The enactment of researcher identities in UK business schoolsEmma Bell, Daniel W Clarke

Management Learning 201, doi: 10.1177/135050761347889

See on mlq.sagepub.com

Leading the Entrepreneurial University: Meeting the Entrepreneurial Development Needs of Higher Education Institutions – Springer

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Abstract

The paper has an innovation focus in that it constitutes part of the preparation for the development of the Entrepreneurial University Leaders Programme (www.eulp.co.uk) which was launched in 2010 by the UK’s National Council for Graduate Entrepreneurship (NCGE), now renamed the National Centre for Entrepreneurship in Education (NCEE), and the Saïd Business School, University of Oxford. The paper demonstrates the thinking and concept behind the program.

 

source:

Universities in ChangeInnovation, Technology, and Knowledge Management 2013, pp 9-45Leading the Entrepreneurial University: Meeting the Entrepreneurial Development Needs of Higher Education InstitutionsAllan Gibb, Gay Haskins, Ian Robertson
See on link.springer.com

Universities in Change – Managing Higher Education Institutions in the Age of Globalization

See on Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

Universities find themselves in dynamic change. They are confronted with growing expectations from their stakeholders, increasing international competition, and new technological challenges. Featuring insights and in-depth case studies from leading researchers and university decision makers from around the world, this book argues that institutions of higher education, in order to be successful, have to actively reflect on circumstances, visions, and strategies to master the future. Drawing from their experiences across a diverse array of institutions in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, the authors explore the pressures on today’s universities and the opportunities for excelling in the contest for resources. They discuss operational issues, such as strategic management, IT governance, leadership development, and entrepreneurial culture, and broader concerns, such as the roles and responsibilities of universities in promoting technology transfer and economic and social development. The result is a resource that not only reveals and analyzes universities from an organizational perspective, but presents best practice models and concrete inspiration for management and policymaking.

Part I The Entrepreneurial University

Part II Embedding in the Economic and Social System

Part III Strategic and Operative Issues

Part IV Contributing to Economic and Social Development

Source:

Universities in ChangeManaging Higher Education Institutions in the Age of GlobalizationEditors: Andreas Altmann, Bernd EbersbergerISBN: 978-1-4614-4589-0 (Print) 978-1-4614-4590-6 (Online)Springer 2013

Frontmatter: http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/bfm%3A978-1-4614-4590-6%2F1

See on link.springer.com

3 Dutch Universities in selective European Research Council list of Organisations hosting at least 25 ERC Principal Investigators

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The annual ERC report contains a very selective performance list containing organisations hosting at least 25 ERC Principal Investigators by funding scheme. Only 3 Dutch universities are able to perform in this high level of top grants: Leiden University, University of Amsterdam and Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Annual report ERC 2012: http://erc.europa.eu/sites/default/files/document/file/erc_annual_report_2012.pdf

 

See on erc.europa.eu

Scientific Trading Dynamics: metaphor to study knowledge transfer and Knowledge Trading Impact in the sciences and social sciences

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scientific trading metaphor 2013-03-16_23-10-10Abstract

We use a trading metaphor to study knowledge transfer in the sciences as well as the social sciences. The metaphor comprises four dimensions: (a) Discipline Self-dependence, (b) Knowledge Exports/Imports, (c) Scientific Trading Dynamics, and (d) Scientific Trading Impact. This framework is applied to a dataset of 221 Web of Science subject categories.

We find that:

(i) the Scientific Trading Impact and Dynamics of materials science and transportation science have increased;

(ii) biomedical disciplines, physics, and mathematics are significant knowledge exporters, as is statistics and probability;

(iii) in the social sciences, economics, business, psychology, management, and sociology are important knowledge exporters; and

(iv) Discipline Self-dependence is associated with specialized domains which have ties to professional practice (e.g., law, ophthalmology, dentistry, oral surgery and medicine, psychology, psychoanalysis, veterinary sciences, and nursing).

The autors:

“We developed a set of concepts to describe scientific trading. Using these concepts, we fashioned a framework comprising four dimensions: (a) Discipline Self-dependence, (b) Exports/Imports, (c) Scientific Trading Dynamics, and (d) Scientific Trading Impact. This framework enabled us to develop a unique, data-rich bird’s-eye view of trends in knowledge trading between disciplines and fields. Our study reveals the permeability and self-sufficiency of different scientific and social scientific disci-plines. The findings should stimulate further research into the nature and dynamics of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity and also help inform science policy making.

Source:

A bird’s-eye view of scientific trading: Dependency relations among fields of science Erjia Yan, Ying Ding, Blaise Cronin, Loet Leydesdorff

Journal of Informetrics 7 (2013) 249– 264

See on arxiv.org

Shaping the Future of Business Education

See on Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

Description:

Business today is changing more rapidly than at any time in history. From product ideas to supply chains, from marketing to sales, new technologies, techniques, and globalization have created incredible, disruptive transformations in every aspect of commerce. This will not change – change will be the only constant. 

Shaping the Future of Business Education answers the question of how to prepare tomorrow’s leaders with a distinctive formula as wide as it is deep. Two dozen distinguished professors and leaders in business education argue that only a broad, rigorous and relevant education will work – a fusion of business knowledge with arts and sciences, technology, and ethical training that emphasizes integrated thinking, broad perspectives, and cultural awareness along with specific expertise. These educators demonstrate practical methods of including arts and sciences in the teaching of business knowledge, while also integrating the best of business into the arts and sciences. The result? Business leaders who can communicate, operate well in ambiguous and fluid situations, as well as liberal-arts students who have the business knowledge they need to work well in organizations.

Introduction; Daniel L. Everett & Michael J. Page

PART I: BACKGROUND
1. The Rise of Business Education in America; Patricia J. Peknik
2. Challenges Facing Today’s Business Schools; Mark M. Davis
3. Business, Management Education, and Leadership for the Common Good; Anders Aspling

PART II: THE BUSINESS EDUCATION PERSPECTIVE
4. Integrating Liberal Learning into the Accounting Curriculum; Catherine A. Usoff
5. How Theory and Practice Inform Each Other: Mathematics and Auditing; Richard J. Cleary & Jay C. Thibodeau
6. Broadening the Profession: New Skills in Actuarial Science; Emily J. Roth, Nicole Belmonte, & Nick A. Komissarov
7. Business Analytics at the Confluence; Dominique Haughton
8. Transforming Business Education through Disciplinary Integration: The Case of Information Systems; Heikki Topi

PART III: THE ARTS & SCIENCES PERSPECTIVE
9. Change Over Time: The Study of the Past and the Future of Business Education; Christopher J. Beneke 
10. The Need to Read; Joan L. Atlas
11. The Role of Law in Business Education; Elizabeth A. Brown
12. Psychology in Business Education: A Response to Rapid Economic and Technological Change; Gregory J. Hall
13. Business Education in an Age of Science and Technology; Frederick D. Ledley & Eric A. Oches
14. Starving for Knowledge: The Need for Business Education in the Arts; Gregory L. Farber

PART IV: CURRENT AND FUTURE EDUCATIONAL TRENDS AT THE HEART OF THE CRUCIAL FUSION
15. Technology and Business Education; William T. Schiano
16. Cases and Emotions; Robert E. Frederick
17. Creativity and Fusion: Moving the Circles; Andrew B. Aylesworth
18. Rethinking the End(s) of Education; Samir Dayal
19. Service-Learning, Business Education, and The Civically Engaged Professional; Edward A. Zlotkowski
20. The Multidisciplinary Nature of Experiential Learning; Diane M. Kellogg
21. Prospects for Fusing Liberal Learning and Business Education in the Changing Environment of Higher Education; Dan Le Clair

Source:

Shaping the Future of Business EducationRelevance, Rigor, and Life PreparationEdited by Gordon M. Hardy and Daniel L. EverettPalgrave Macmillan, 2013

See on www.palgrave.com

Citation patterns in organization and management journals: Margins and centres in the field

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Abstract

Citations tell us something about the patterns of knowledge exchange around a particular journal. To examine this network, one can use Thomson Reuters’ Journal Citation Reports database and derive three basic citation relationships: the numbers of articles citing (and thus influenced by) a journal, articles cited by (thus influencing) a journal, as well as the self-citation rate of the journal. In this article we examine the patterns relating to 27 selected journals in organization and management. The article proposes an influence metric with a citing and cited pair. The metric is applied to develop a taxonomy which classifies journals into one of four types of influence network, and comments on the way in which this sort of citation data locates Organization clearly on the margins in a number of important ways. We also comment on whether marginalization is an effect of interdisciplinarity, and political and methodological heterodoxy.

 

The authors:

“Some journals are central to the field, both in terms of volume of citations and the places that their citations come from and go to. Other journals are less important, based on volume of citations, and yet others are both less important and more marginal, in terms of citing more outside the field………We conclude by asking whether a journal could be critical of a field and still be central to it in citation terms. It seems unlikely, simply because it seems to need to reflect disciplinary orthodoxies (in method, epistemology and politics) in order to become an institution which reproduces a field, in terms of citation influence. In some sense then, the cost of heterodoxy is the likelihood that work will not be read as much, cited as much, and count for ranking exercises.”

 

Source:

Citation patterns in organization and management journals: Margins and centresEldon Y. Li, Martin Parker

Organization March 2013 vol. 20 no. 2 299-322

Doi: 10.1177/1350508412455118

See on org.sagepub.com

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