Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers; Measuring Higher Education’s Role in Economic Development

See on Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

Comprehensive examination of the relationship between higher education, state government, and economic development.

Local, state, and national economies are facing unprecedented levels of international competition. The current fiscal crisis has hampered the ability of many governments in the developed world to directly facilitate economic growth. At the same time, many governments in the developing world are investing significant new resources into local infrastructure and industry development initiatives. At the heart of the current economic transformation lie our colleges and universities. Through their roles in education, innovation, knowledge transfer, and community engagement, these institutions are working toward spurring economic growth and prosperity.

 

This book brings together leading scholars from a variety of disciplines to assess how universities and colleges exert impact on economic growth. The contributors consider various methodologies, metrics, and data sources that may be used to gauge the performance of diverse higher education institutions in improving economic outcomes in the United States and around the world. Also presented are new typologies of economic development activities and related state policies that are designed to improve understanding of such initiatives and generate new energy and focus for an international community of scholars and practitioners working to formulate new models for how public universities and colleges may lead economic development in their states and communities while still performing their traditional educational functions.

 

Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers is meant to cultivate greater understanding among elected officials, business representatives, policymakers, and other concerned parties about the central roles universities and colleges play in national, state, and local economies.

Jason E. Lane is Director of Education Studies and Senior Fellow at the Rockefeller Institute of Government and Associate Professor of Educational Administration and Policy Studies at the University at Albany, State University of New York. D. Bruce Johnstone is Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Higher and Comparative Education at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, and former Chancellor of the State University of New York. Both have published several books focusing on both US and international higher education.

 

Source:

Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers
Measuring Higher Education’s Role in Economic Development

Click on image to enlarge

Jason E. Lane – Editor
D. Bruce Johnstone – Editor
Nancy L. Zimpher – Foreword by
SUNY series, Critical Issues in Higher Education
Hardcover – 338 pages
Release Date: November 2012
ISBN13: 978-1-4384-4501-4

 

See on www.sunypress.edu

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About Wilfred Mijnhardt
RMIMR is my virtual playground, a place to reflect on issues from my professional context, my job as Policy Director at Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM). RSM is the international university based business school at Erasmus University Rotterdam. More info here: www.rsm.nl Here is my list of relevant publications on the topic of my RMIMR weblog: http://www.mendeley.com/collections/694621/RMIMR-Repository/ The rss feed for my RMIMR collection is here: http://www.mendeley.com/collections/rss/694621/ Here is my other weblog on impact of research: http://www.scoop.it/t/dualimpact

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