Impact Case Studies: Pathways to Impact

See on Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

Research Councils UK (RCUK) have launched a number of best practice case studies online to help inspire applicants with the Pathways to Impact section of their application.

 

Pathways to Impact encourage researchers to consider the sorts of activities that may help their research to have an impact. A wide variety of activities have been funded by being specified within the Pathway to Impact section including public engagement, direct collaborations with beneficiaries, events, policy briefings and many more.

 

The case studies provide personal accounts from RCUK funded researchers in regards to their approaches and experiences of Pathways to Impact. The case studies also provide guidance, top tips and best practice for helping researchers to realise the impact of their research.

 

Further case studies will be added to build a knowledge bank of experience and best practice that researchers can draw onThe case studies provide personal accounts from Research Councils UK (RCUK) funded researchers in regards to their approaches and experiences of Pathways to Impact. The case studies also provide guidance, top tips and best practice for helping researchers to realise the impact of their research.

 

Business case studies: Case studies which highlight researchers fostering partnerships with business and industry

 

Business

These case studies highlight researchers fostering partnerships with business and industry to achieve economic and societal impact. Researchers working in partnership with business will help ensure that we generate innovation and commercialisation of ideas for growth.

 

Professor Martin Bache: from the University of Swansea emphasises the importance of thinking about the knowledge exchange and impact that occurs from the flow of people from research into industry and vice versa. An important route to commercial impact has also been his close working with Rolls Royce.

 

Ian Lazarus: at the STFC Daresbury Laboratory provides technical and engineering support to nuclear physicists. However, the work of him and his colleagues at the Nuclear Physics Group (NPG) has potential impact beyond his field and applications to the medical and security industries. Further collaborations have resulted from networking which means a new technology in development may help improve future diagnosis of cancer.

 

Professor Nick Jennings: is from the University of Southampton and has led an award winning project with BAE Systems which has generated a number of patents and technologies. Success has been due to the constant and regular cooperation and communication with the users of research to ensure research outputs were applied effectively and to steer the direction of the research.

 

Professor Lucio Piccirillo: from the University of Manchester highlights how talking to people outside of his own discipline of radioastronomy has led to many impact opportunities. He encourages other researchers to talk to researchers outside their field when completing their Pathways to Impact and highlights the value of building up a network of contacts.

 

Professor Rhodri Williams: from the University of Swansea changed the direction of his research from the rheology of industrial engineering fluids to rheology of blood coagulation through a chance meeting. As a result, Swansea is now seen as a world-leading centre in this field and him and his colleagues have two spin-out two companies, and are having a clinical impact in local hospitals. He now regularly engages with a wide variety of users including the general public, as the feedback he receives from them has been invaluable to his research.

 

Professor Nick Tyler: from University College London researches how people interact with the environment which has led him to set up the Pedestrian Accessibility and Movement Environment Laboratory (PAMELA). To maximise the impact of his research he has engaged with users and the public which has led to a collaboration with Thameslink2000 train link in London which has had national impact for train design in the UK.

See on www.rcuk.ac.uk

Advertisements

About Wilfred Mijnhardt
RMIMR is my virtual playground, a place to reflect on issues from my professional context, my job as Policy Director at Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM). RSM is the international university based business school at Erasmus University Rotterdam. More info here: www.rsm.nl Here is my list of relevant publications on the topic of my RMIMR weblog: http://www.mendeley.com/collections/694621/RMIMR-Repository/ The rss feed for my RMIMR collection is here: http://www.mendeley.com/collections/rss/694621/ Here is my other weblog on impact of research: http://www.scoop.it/t/dualimpact

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

RSS Business School News

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
Locations of Site Visitors
%d bloggers like this: