Citation-based metrics are appropriate tools in journal assessment

Via Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

The authors discuss the value of journal metrics for the assessment of scientific-scholarly journals from a general bibliometric perspective, and from
the point of view of creators of new journal metrics, journal editors and publishers. They conclude that citation-based indicators of journal performance are appropriate tools in journal assessment provided that they are accurate, and used with care and competence.

 

Source: Scientometrics, Online First™, 24 March 2012

Citation-based metrics are appropriate tools in journal assessment provided that they are accurate and used in an informed way

Henk F. Moed, Lisa Colledge, Jan Reedijk, Felix Moya-Anegon, Vicente Guerrero-Bote, Andrew Plume and Mayur Amin

DOI: 10.1007/s11192-012-0679-8

Via www.springerlink.com

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What Is A Scientific Social Network? 6 Thriving and Inspiring examples which can be used to understand scientific social communities

Via Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

A recent article from the Huffington Post states that social networks for scientists won’t work because there is no incentive from a career perspective. The piece focuses on ResearchGate and takes a stab at the Economist’s article about the community.  The value of social networks for scientists lies in faster access to information relevant to their research and the communities that are made more available by new tools.
Via comprendia.com

The state of European University-Business Cooperation

Via Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

This report presents the finding of a fifteen and a half month study on the cooperation between HEIs and public and private organisations in Europe. It was conducted by the Science-to-Business Marketing Research Centre, Germany (S2BMRC) for the DG Education and Culture at the European Commission (EC) during 2010 and 2011.
The main components of the project were in-depth qualitative interviews with 10 recognised industry
experts as well as a major quantitative survey. The survey was translated into 22 languages and sent to
all registered European HEIs (numbering over 3,000) in 33 countries during March 2011. Through this, a final sample population of 6,280 academics and HEI representatives was achieved making the study the largest study into cooperation between HEIs and business yet completed in Europe. Further, 30 good practice UBC case studies have been created to provide positive examples of European UBC.   Study objectives
The key questions addressed in the study were:
• how extensive is UBC in European HEIs?,
• why do some academics and HEIs engage in UBC and not others?,
• if situational factors are only part of the explanation for UBC activity, what else can help to
explain total European UBC?   Report: The State of European University-Business Cooperation Final Report – Study on the cooperation between Higher Education Institutions and public and private organisations in Europe http://ec.europa.eu/education/higher-education/doc/studies/munster_en.pdf Case studies: http://ec.europa.eu/education/higher-education/doc/studies/munstercase_en.pdf  
Via ec.europa.eu

Development of a University-Based Knowledge Mobilization Unit that Enhances Research Outreach and Engagement

Via Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

This field note presents reflections from the perspective of a knowledge mobilization
(KMb) practitioner after five years of developing and delivering KMb services in a
university-based environment. This field note is a “how-to” based on experience in the
field of KMb practice and places that experience in the context of academic literature.
The article concludes that KMb is not a single event or process but a system, a suite of
services working together to support the multidirectional connection of researchers
with decision-makers. The six KMb services comprising the KMb system are informed
by four broad KMb methods: producer push, user pull, knowledge exchange, and coproduction.
Examples of each service are provided along with key observations that allow
others interested in developing institutional KMb support services to implement these
services in their own context. The field note concludes with clear recommendations for
individuals and organizations interested in developing their own system of KMb services.   source: Phipps, David. (2011). A Report Detailing the Development of a University-Based Knowledge Mobilization Unit that Enhances Research Outreach and Engagement. Scholarly and Research Communication, 2(2): 020502, 13 pp. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/10236 Fulltext: http://pi.library.yorku.ca/dspace/bitstream/handle/10315/10236/Phipps%20SRC%20Field%20Note%202011.pdf?sequence=1
Via pi.library.yorku.ca

Personal Benefits of Maximising Inbound Links to Research Papers

Via Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

A recent post on this blog which described How Researchers Can Use Inbound Linking Strategies to Enhance Access to Their Papers reviewed personal experiences of the benefits of making use of third party services to provide inbound links to research publications. In the post the author suggested that the large numbers of downloads of my papers from the University of Bath institutional repository may be due to the enhanced Google juice provided by having links to my papers from such services. The purpose of the post was to suggest that researchers may benefit from increased access to their research publications if they are pro-active in using such services. source: Brian Kelly (UK Web Focus) on 5 March 2012
Via ukwebfocus.wordpress.com

Citations to highly-cited researchers by their co-authors and their self-citations: How these factors affect highly-cited researchers’ h-index in Scopus

Via Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

The h-index is one of the recent indicators in the field of scientometric which introduced by Jorge Hirsch and measures both the productivity and impact of scholars’ work. It has been widely used to show the relevance of the research work of prominent scholars. But, does h-index really show this relevance? The purpose of this study is to investigate the frequency of citations to highly-cited researchers by their co-authors, as well as to quantify the weight of self-citations of highly-cited researchers’ in three fields of science: clinical medicine, computer science, and economics & business. Finally, the researchers seek to evaluate the impact of these two elements on their h-index in the Scopus database. In this research, highly-cited researchers were selected from the three fields via HighlyCited.com. The study population includes 999 highly-cited researchers in these three fields (280 authors in clinical medicine, 373 authors in computer science, and 346 authors in economics & business). The results show that the average rate of self-citations and co-author citations in clinical medicine is more than computer science, and in computer science is more than economics & business. The results show that there is a positive correlation between self-citation and total citations (P<0.01) in these three fields. The results also show that there is a positive correlation between "co-author citations" and total citations (P<0.01). Moreover, there is a positive correlation between self-citations and h-index of highly-cited researchers as well as co-author citations and h-index of highly-cited researchers in the above-mentioned three fields. It is seen that there is a significant difference in self-citations behavior and co-author citation behavior in different fields which relates to subject context. Co-author citation is an indicator which, on the one hand, not under control of own researcher and, on the other hand, represents the structure of scientific communications. Although the number of citations is not necessarily increased by raising the number of authors, but co-author citations increased by raising the number of co-authors.   source: Citations to highly-cited researchers by their co-authors and their self-citations: How these factors affect highly-cited researchers' h-index in Scopus Leila Dehghani
Faculty Member, Department of Medical Library and Information Science, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran. Reza Basirian Jahromi
Faculty Member, Department of Medical Library and Information Science, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran. Mazyar Ganjoo
Department of Computer Science, Islamic Azad University- Bushehr Branch, Bushehr, Iran.   Webology, Volume 8, Number 2, December, 2011
Via www.webology.org

on the importance of good management for innovation in europe….or: Is management education and research a blind spot in European policy?

Via Scoop.itDual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university

Improving management practises is essential for boosting research and innovation in Europe at a time when everyone’s moto is “more for less”, writes Richard Straub from EFMD.   “Sociologists characterise 20th-century society as a society with fundamentally new characteristics compared with previous historical societies. It is a society of organisations. Organisations have pervaded all parts of our lives. They range from business organisations, to education, hospitals, semi-public and public organisations, NPOs, and so on. They are the organs of modern society – hence society is dependent on their quality. In order to function they need to have means to achieve their purpose. This is where management comes in – without proper management the organisations cannot achieve their purpose. It is quite obvious for businesses, but equally clear for education institutions, hospitals, research organisations and public sector bodies. Against a backdrop of the modern society of organisations, the systematic study of management started in the early part of the 20th century and saw a notable acceleration in the post-war years. University-based business schools and independent institutions sprang up everywhere leading today to a mind-boggling number of more the 12,000 globally. Large businesses were the natural place to start with education and the systematic application of management as their increasing scale, scope and complexity required specific skills to survive and thrive in competitive markets. The emerging discipline of management included various elements such as operations, human resources, strategy, leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship. General management and increasingly specialised disciplines took on an accelerated development, which can be measured by the number of books, scientific articles and management conferences. Besides a few fads a huge body of useful knowledge (ancient Greek – Techne) was produced that made management an essential social technology. Yet outside business the application of management knowledge was rather limited, to say the least.   source: euractive.com; Published 29 February 2012 – Updated 01 March 2012 Author: Richard Straub is Director of EU Affairs and Corporate Services at EFMD (European Foundation for Management Development), an international membership organisation based in Brussels.
Via www.euractiv.com

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